Developers
August 27, 2020

Should I Choose GCP or AWS for Kubernetes Deployments?

Google GKE or Amazon's EKS? Evaluate the pros and cons and make a smart decision for your Kubernetes deployments.

Kubernetes has become the popular open-source container orchestration platform in the past few years. It makes deployment and management of multi-container applications easier. More and more organizations are leveraging Kubernetes to remodel their services and applications. In the meantime, AWS and GCP are providing services and features to let organizations manage their Kubernetes architecture. But have you ever had the Google vs Amazon dispute when choosing where to deploy your services? Today we will talk about the differences and which one you should choose at the time of running your Kubernetes service.

What is Kubernetes?

Kubernetes has been growing a lot in the past years and is expected to become the standard for container platforms. Between the two service providers, we found out that both have their pros and cons.

To make the best decision possible in this scenario, one has to make sure that there are more pros than cons and then compare them both out of which one has more pros and why.

We are not going to recommend one product over the other, we believe that’s your responsibility and decision. But we can and will guide you through so that you can take an informed decision.

Amazon developed its EC2 container service, so you can have a containerized cluster. It’s a closed source, as opposed to Kubernetes, which is an entirely open source. The fact that Kubernetes is open source, is beneficial in the sense that you are not tied up to one service provider.

The skills one gain from using Kubernetes can be later used in other products and systems. But the skills acquired by using ECS are very specialized and don’t apply to the majority of the work you do. This means that running ECS or Kubernetes on AWS requires a good amount of manual effort.

 On the terms of automation VS the utilization of Manual Effort, one has to consider that Google’s GKE shortens the learning curve because it comes with an already set baseline. You can set up the cluster and have your service running in less than 10 minutes.

In this field, AWS requires much more work to set up the cluster. What tooling to choose and how to build your cluster is part of the manual process. GKE automatically bootstraps your clusters.

AWS doesn’t come with a managed Kubernetes installation. GKE comes with a managed Kubernetes installation. GKE is backed by Google, meaning that you can use all their GCP tooling. Logging, management tools, monitoring tools, among others.

Talking about Agility, we must remark that Google is the company that has been together with Kubernetes since its beginning. What does this have to do with its agility? Well, users say it comes with an easy set-up, native Kubernetes commands and features are supported too. All of this has been developed by pioneering in the service.

 

Pricing

The cost models and cost differences between GCP and AWS, between GKE and EKS, are also important factors when deciding which to use. Both service providers give a pay as you go business model. You only pay for what you use. There’s an hourly rate that is tied to your specific usage.

Despite both service providers are based on the same business model, they have different ways of calculating operational costs. An 8-node cluster that runs 100 hours every month, on GCP costs $38. On the other hand, AWS charges $72 a month for the same, charging $0,10 cents an hour.

The cost difference is based on differences in the infrastructure and operational costs of both service providers. AWS counts with a more robust infrastructure, but at the same time, the user ends up paying more.

This price is established based on infrastructure and it includes the cluster cost. Both service providers ask you to pay for the computational costs.

If you are running smaller applications, there is almost no difference. This means that you are not going to save depending on your application size, but on the provider you choose.

 

Containerization services are not only used for personal applications or business applications. They are empowering whole industries. Big data, artificial intelligence, and deep learning. These applications require computing power and specific hardware such as GPUs.

The good news is that you can run a full machine learning cycle in the cloud at a much faster pace. There’s no need any longer to invest in hardware like the TX2. You can develop AI models that are specific to your use cases without spending extravagant amounts of capital.

In conclusion, in this article, we have described the two popular options to run your Kubernetes service. Both services have their pros and cons. In order to make the best decision, one must evaluate a couple of factors, with all of them summed, resulting in more pros than cons.

Despite both service providers are based on the same business model, they have different ways of calculating operational costs. An 8-node cluster that runs 100 hours every month, on GCP costs $38 and on AWS $72 a month. We neutrally and explicitly described both products in comparison. We have no preference for one product over the other, and we believe it’s your responsibility to make an informed decision.

TagsKubernetesGCPAWSGoogle GKEAWS EKS
Lucas Bonder
Technical Writer
Lucas is an Entrepreneur, Web Developer, and Article Writer about Technology.

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DevelopersAugust 27, 2020
Should I Choose GCP or AWS for Kubernetes Deployments?
Google GKE or Amazon's EKS? Evaluate the pros and cons and make a smart decision for your Kubernetes deployments.

Kubernetes has become the popular open-source container orchestration platform in the past few years. It makes deployment and management of multi-container applications easier. More and more organizations are leveraging Kubernetes to remodel their services and applications. In the meantime, AWS and GCP are providing services and features to let organizations manage their Kubernetes architecture. But have you ever had the Google vs Amazon dispute when choosing where to deploy your services? Today we will talk about the differences and which one you should choose at the time of running your Kubernetes service.

What is Kubernetes?

Kubernetes has been growing a lot in the past years and is expected to become the standard for container platforms. Between the two service providers, we found out that both have their pros and cons.

To make the best decision possible in this scenario, one has to make sure that there are more pros than cons and then compare them both out of which one has more pros and why.

We are not going to recommend one product over the other, we believe that’s your responsibility and decision. But we can and will guide you through so that you can take an informed decision.

Amazon developed its EC2 container service, so you can have a containerized cluster. It’s a closed source, as opposed to Kubernetes, which is an entirely open source. The fact that Kubernetes is open source, is beneficial in the sense that you are not tied up to one service provider.

The skills one gain from using Kubernetes can be later used in other products and systems. But the skills acquired by using ECS are very specialized and don’t apply to the majority of the work you do. This means that running ECS or Kubernetes on AWS requires a good amount of manual effort.

 On the terms of automation VS the utilization of Manual Effort, one has to consider that Google’s GKE shortens the learning curve because it comes with an already set baseline. You can set up the cluster and have your service running in less than 10 minutes.

In this field, AWS requires much more work to set up the cluster. What tooling to choose and how to build your cluster is part of the manual process. GKE automatically bootstraps your clusters.

AWS doesn’t come with a managed Kubernetes installation. GKE comes with a managed Kubernetes installation. GKE is backed by Google, meaning that you can use all their GCP tooling. Logging, management tools, monitoring tools, among others.

Talking about Agility, we must remark that Google is the company that has been together with Kubernetes since its beginning. What does this have to do with its agility? Well, users say it comes with an easy set-up, native Kubernetes commands and features are supported too. All of this has been developed by pioneering in the service.

 

Pricing

The cost models and cost differences between GCP and AWS, between GKE and EKS, are also important factors when deciding which to use. Both service providers give a pay as you go business model. You only pay for what you use. There’s an hourly rate that is tied to your specific usage.

Despite both service providers are based on the same business model, they have different ways of calculating operational costs. An 8-node cluster that runs 100 hours every month, on GCP costs $38. On the other hand, AWS charges $72 a month for the same, charging $0,10 cents an hour.

The cost difference is based on differences in the infrastructure and operational costs of both service providers. AWS counts with a more robust infrastructure, but at the same time, the user ends up paying more.

This price is established based on infrastructure and it includes the cluster cost. Both service providers ask you to pay for the computational costs.

If you are running smaller applications, there is almost no difference. This means that you are not going to save depending on your application size, but on the provider you choose.

 

Containerization services are not only used for personal applications or business applications. They are empowering whole industries. Big data, artificial intelligence, and deep learning. These applications require computing power and specific hardware such as GPUs.

The good news is that you can run a full machine learning cycle in the cloud at a much faster pace. There’s no need any longer to invest in hardware like the TX2. You can develop AI models that are specific to your use cases without spending extravagant amounts of capital.

In conclusion, in this article, we have described the two popular options to run your Kubernetes service. Both services have their pros and cons. In order to make the best decision, one must evaluate a couple of factors, with all of them summed, resulting in more pros than cons.

Despite both service providers are based on the same business model, they have different ways of calculating operational costs. An 8-node cluster that runs 100 hours every month, on GCP costs $38 and on AWS $72 a month. We neutrally and explicitly described both products in comparison. We have no preference for one product over the other, and we believe it’s your responsibility to make an informed decision.

Kubernetes
GCP
AWS
Google GKE
AWS EKS
About the author
Lucas Bonder -Technical Writer
Lucas is an Entrepreneur, Web Developer, and Article Writer about Technology.

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