Developers
August 11, 2020

GCP Uses a Collection of Network Endpoints To Enable Hybrid Architectures with Cloud CDN and Load Balancing

To enable hybrid architectures for business, Google leverages a global collection of network endpoints to let you pull content or reach web services that are on-prem or in another cloud.

Today we will talk about a solution for the need for hybrid deployments. You may currently have content and workloads that are in other clouds and at the same time, you want the benefit of high availability of a single virtual IP address.

So you can pull content or reach web services that are currently in another cloud, Google is providing support to the HTTPS Load Balancing Services. It occurs using Google's global network.

What is a network endpoint group (NEG)? It's a collection of network endpoints. They are used as backends for load balancers so that they can define how the set of endpoints are reached. 

The hybrid configuration is the result of the new internet network endpoint groups. It allows you to configure a public endpoint that is located outside of Google Cloud. This means that you can use the server or load balancer that is running externally. Once this happens, you can serve web and video content via Cloud CDN or serve a shopping cart via an HTTPS Load Balancer.

What can you do with internet network endpoint groups?

There are five main things you can do with the internet network endpoint groups.

  1. Use Google's global edge infrastructure to terminate your user connection closes to where users are.
  2. Route traffic to your external origin/backend based on host, path, query parameter, and/or header values. This allows you to direct different requests to different sets of infrastructure.
  3. Enable Cloud CDN to cache and serve popular content closest to your users across the world.
  4. Deliver traffic to your public endpoint across Google's private backbone. This improves reliability and can decrease latency between client and server.
  5. Protect your on-prem deployments with Cloud Armor, Google Cloud’s DDoS, and application defense service. Configure a backend service that includes the NEG containing the external endpoint and associating a Cloud Armor Policy to it.

Endpoints can be either a publicly resolvable hostname or the public IP address of the endpoint itself. In any way, they can be reached over HTTPS or HTTP. Following next we will take a look at a use case of how hybrid deployment works.  

Custom origins for Cloud CDN

Internet NEGs enable you to serve and accelerate content that is hosted on the origins of Google Cloud. This happens via Cloud CDN. It uses the global backbone to keep latency down and availability up.

If you have a large library of content, this can work for you, as you will need migration to the cloud. It will also work for you if you are on a multi-cloud architecture where your web server infrastructure is hosted externally, on another cloud. There are many cases where people decide to complement their cloud infrastructure by taking advantage of Google Cloud's benefits.

Hybrid Global Load Balancing

Moving your entire infrastructure to the cloud may take time and effort, most organizations that decide they want to move to the cloud do it in phases. By using Internet NEGs, you make the most of the global network and the load balancing.

After the configuration process, the requests are proxied and handled by the HTTP and HTTPS load balancer. It handles services that run on Google Cloud or on any other cloud too.  

One security benefit is that you can protect your backend workloads from DDoS attacks by using Cloud Armor. This can be affected by the use of Google's global edge and the global network.  

In the first launch of the Internet NEG, a single non- Google Cloud endpoint is supported. The typical use case is when endpoints point to a load balancer with a virtual IP address on-premise. 

The service is currently being updated so that multiple endpoints for the internet NEG can be supported. New NEG capabilities including support for multiple addresses and load balancing endpoints are being added.

Hybrid connectivity options are available wherever you are. The next generation of improvements Is currently being crafted. No matter where your infrastructure is currently located, you can still dive into the Cloud CDN. A Whitepaper is available if you would like to know more about infrastructure modernization.

In conclusion, if you currently have your infrastructure in another cloud and you want to benefit from the Google Cloud Services, you can migrate to the cloud with no difficulty. It's recommended to do it in phases, so data is migrated safely and correctly. A typical use case is Cloud CDN. It uses the global backbone to keep the latency down and the availability up. If you currently have large sizes of content, this is your pick, Cloud CDN. It still works if you are on multi-cloud architecture, where your web server is hosted externally. It is recommended to read the Whitepaper on infrastructure modernization before taking any big decision.

TagsHybrid ArchitecturesDeployments
Lucas Bonder
Technical Writer
Lucas is an Entrepreneur, Web Developer, and Article Writer about Technology.

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DevelopersAugust 11, 2020
GCP Uses a Collection of Network Endpoints To Enable Hybrid Architectures with Cloud CDN and Load Balancing
To enable hybrid architectures for business, Google leverages a global collection of network endpoints to let you pull content or reach web services that are on-prem or in another cloud.

Today we will talk about a solution for the need for hybrid deployments. You may currently have content and workloads that are in other clouds and at the same time, you want the benefit of high availability of a single virtual IP address.

So you can pull content or reach web services that are currently in another cloud, Google is providing support to the HTTPS Load Balancing Services. It occurs using Google's global network.

What is a network endpoint group (NEG)? It's a collection of network endpoints. They are used as backends for load balancers so that they can define how the set of endpoints are reached. 

The hybrid configuration is the result of the new internet network endpoint groups. It allows you to configure a public endpoint that is located outside of Google Cloud. This means that you can use the server or load balancer that is running externally. Once this happens, you can serve web and video content via Cloud CDN or serve a shopping cart via an HTTPS Load Balancer.

What can you do with internet network endpoint groups?

There are five main things you can do with the internet network endpoint groups.

  1. Use Google's global edge infrastructure to terminate your user connection closes to where users are.
  2. Route traffic to your external origin/backend based on host, path, query parameter, and/or header values. This allows you to direct different requests to different sets of infrastructure.
  3. Enable Cloud CDN to cache and serve popular content closest to your users across the world.
  4. Deliver traffic to your public endpoint across Google's private backbone. This improves reliability and can decrease latency between client and server.
  5. Protect your on-prem deployments with Cloud Armor, Google Cloud’s DDoS, and application defense service. Configure a backend service that includes the NEG containing the external endpoint and associating a Cloud Armor Policy to it.

Endpoints can be either a publicly resolvable hostname or the public IP address of the endpoint itself. In any way, they can be reached over HTTPS or HTTP. Following next we will take a look at a use case of how hybrid deployment works.  

Custom origins for Cloud CDN

Internet NEGs enable you to serve and accelerate content that is hosted on the origins of Google Cloud. This happens via Cloud CDN. It uses the global backbone to keep latency down and availability up.

If you have a large library of content, this can work for you, as you will need migration to the cloud. It will also work for you if you are on a multi-cloud architecture where your web server infrastructure is hosted externally, on another cloud. There are many cases where people decide to complement their cloud infrastructure by taking advantage of Google Cloud's benefits.

Hybrid Global Load Balancing

Moving your entire infrastructure to the cloud may take time and effort, most organizations that decide they want to move to the cloud do it in phases. By using Internet NEGs, you make the most of the global network and the load balancing.

After the configuration process, the requests are proxied and handled by the HTTP and HTTPS load balancer. It handles services that run on Google Cloud or on any other cloud too.  

One security benefit is that you can protect your backend workloads from DDoS attacks by using Cloud Armor. This can be affected by the use of Google's global edge and the global network.  

In the first launch of the Internet NEG, a single non- Google Cloud endpoint is supported. The typical use case is when endpoints point to a load balancer with a virtual IP address on-premise. 

The service is currently being updated so that multiple endpoints for the internet NEG can be supported. New NEG capabilities including support for multiple addresses and load balancing endpoints are being added.

Hybrid connectivity options are available wherever you are. The next generation of improvements Is currently being crafted. No matter where your infrastructure is currently located, you can still dive into the Cloud CDN. A Whitepaper is available if you would like to know more about infrastructure modernization.

In conclusion, if you currently have your infrastructure in another cloud and you want to benefit from the Google Cloud Services, you can migrate to the cloud with no difficulty. It's recommended to do it in phases, so data is migrated safely and correctly. A typical use case is Cloud CDN. It uses the global backbone to keep the latency down and the availability up. If you currently have large sizes of content, this is your pick, Cloud CDN. It still works if you are on multi-cloud architecture, where your web server is hosted externally. It is recommended to read the Whitepaper on infrastructure modernization before taking any big decision.

Hybrid Architectures
Deployments
About the author
Lucas Bonder -Technical Writer
Lucas is an Entrepreneur, Web Developer, and Article Writer about Technology.

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