Developers
June 12, 2020

Google Cloud Unveils Cloud SQL Cross-Region Replication

Google Cloud takes a big step toward improving continuity for its customers.
Source: Unsplash

Google Cloud has announced the launch of cross-region, Cloud SQL replication. This is good news for Google Cloud customers, and will go a long way toward ensuring continuity and improved performance.

Cloud Computing and Google Cloud

Recent years have seen the rise of cloud computing over traditional computing methods. In fact, it’s estimated that some 90% of companies are already on the cloud, with the global market set to pass $330 billion in 2020.

Cloud computing covers the gamut of IT services companies rely on. Platform as a service (PaaS), infrastructure as a service (IaaS) and software as a service (SaaS) are all available.

With such a transformational shift in business computing, it’s safe to say cloud computing offers a number of significant advantages over traditional models, especially in the enterprise.

First and foremost is cost. Cloud computing allows companies to use resources on-demand, with a pay-as-you-go model. This ensures that companies only pay for what they need, when they need it. In contrast, with traditional computing, a company must invest money upfront to buy the computers, hardware and software they need.

Similarly, cloud computing takes the labor and cost of upgrades out of the equation. With traditional computing, upgrades can be an arduous and expensive process: rolling out updates across workstations, dealing with incompatibilities, performing pre-upgrade backups and more. With cloud computing, updates are performed on the server, automatically benefiting the client stations.

Scalability is another major advantage. As a company needs more resources, it simply adds more to the plan it’s on, allowing it to scale up as needed almost instantly. In contrast, traditional models require an organization to purchase more equipment, license more software, set it up and deploy it.

Cloud computing also provides a much more mobile platform for a company to operate from. Because cloud-computing software is web-based, employees are not restricted to the traditional operating systems (OS) that have dominated the enterprise for decades. With the rise of bring-your-own-device (BYOD) computing, cloud computing makes it possible for employees to be productive with their own computers, phones and tablets, regardless of the OS they’re running.

One of the single biggest advantages of cloud computing is backups and redundancy. Because everything is stored in the cloud, backups are far easier to manage and maintain than with on-premise systems. In addition, because data is stored remotely, likely in multiple locations, it helps ensure that a local disaster will have little to no impact on business operations.

All of these points combine to make Google’s announcement all the more significant.

Cloud SQL Cross-Region Replication: What It Means

Cross-region replication is a critical component of cloud computing, especially for companies with international operations. It gives companies the ability to create a full replicate of cloud data in a region other than the primary region they operate in.

Needless to say, this can be an important part of a company’s backup and disaster recovery strategy, virtually guaranteeing that no single disaster can wipe out its operations.

The implications, however, go far beyond mere disaster recovery and backups. Cross-region support also allows an organization to better support its customers around the world, providing an identical, seamless experience for all of them.

“We store all our important tracking information such as location of player, pitch velocity, and even the wind data on Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL,” Greg Cain, MLB vice president, Baseball Data, told Google Cloud. “We take great pride as the national pastime with millions of fans across the U.S., but we also have a large fanbase beyond that which spans all seven continents around the world. Our global audiences enjoy watching games at all times of day on MLB.com and our different consumer products. Cross-region replication was a very critical feature for us to implement to provide uninterrupted services to our fans.”

What Cross-Region Replication Means For Google Cloud

In the US market, Google Cloud is currently in third place, behind Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure. CEO Thomas Kurian has the goal of helping the company move to the number two spot within five years.

Cloud SQL cross-region support is a big step in that direction. It will help the company better support its customers around the world. If the company hopes to achieve its goal of becoming the number two provider in five years, it will need to compete on all levels with its two larger rivals, and this will help it do that.

For developers, this feature is a major upgrade that will make their lives easier, and greatly improve their backup and disaster recovery operations. At the same time, companies will be able to offer a seamless experience for their customers around the world.

TagsGoogle CloudSQLCloud Computing
Matt Milano
Technical Writer
Matt is a tech journalist and writer with a background in web and software development.

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DevelopersJune 12, 2020
Google Cloud Unveils Cloud SQL Cross-Region Replication
Google Cloud takes a big step toward improving continuity for its customers.

Google Cloud has announced the launch of cross-region, Cloud SQL replication. This is good news for Google Cloud customers, and will go a long way toward ensuring continuity and improved performance.

Cloud Computing and Google Cloud

Recent years have seen the rise of cloud computing over traditional computing methods. In fact, it’s estimated that some 90% of companies are already on the cloud, with the global market set to pass $330 billion in 2020.

Cloud computing covers the gamut of IT services companies rely on. Platform as a service (PaaS), infrastructure as a service (IaaS) and software as a service (SaaS) are all available.

With such a transformational shift in business computing, it’s safe to say cloud computing offers a number of significant advantages over traditional models, especially in the enterprise.

First and foremost is cost. Cloud computing allows companies to use resources on-demand, with a pay-as-you-go model. This ensures that companies only pay for what they need, when they need it. In contrast, with traditional computing, a company must invest money upfront to buy the computers, hardware and software they need.

Similarly, cloud computing takes the labor and cost of upgrades out of the equation. With traditional computing, upgrades can be an arduous and expensive process: rolling out updates across workstations, dealing with incompatibilities, performing pre-upgrade backups and more. With cloud computing, updates are performed on the server, automatically benefiting the client stations.

Scalability is another major advantage. As a company needs more resources, it simply adds more to the plan it’s on, allowing it to scale up as needed almost instantly. In contrast, traditional models require an organization to purchase more equipment, license more software, set it up and deploy it.

Cloud computing also provides a much more mobile platform for a company to operate from. Because cloud-computing software is web-based, employees are not restricted to the traditional operating systems (OS) that have dominated the enterprise for decades. With the rise of bring-your-own-device (BYOD) computing, cloud computing makes it possible for employees to be productive with their own computers, phones and tablets, regardless of the OS they’re running.

One of the single biggest advantages of cloud computing is backups and redundancy. Because everything is stored in the cloud, backups are far easier to manage and maintain than with on-premise systems. In addition, because data is stored remotely, likely in multiple locations, it helps ensure that a local disaster will have little to no impact on business operations.

All of these points combine to make Google’s announcement all the more significant.

Cloud SQL Cross-Region Replication: What It Means

Cross-region replication is a critical component of cloud computing, especially for companies with international operations. It gives companies the ability to create a full replicate of cloud data in a region other than the primary region they operate in.

Needless to say, this can be an important part of a company’s backup and disaster recovery strategy, virtually guaranteeing that no single disaster can wipe out its operations.

The implications, however, go far beyond mere disaster recovery and backups. Cross-region support also allows an organization to better support its customers around the world, providing an identical, seamless experience for all of them.

“We store all our important tracking information such as location of player, pitch velocity, and even the wind data on Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL,” Greg Cain, MLB vice president, Baseball Data, told Google Cloud. “We take great pride as the national pastime with millions of fans across the U.S., but we also have a large fanbase beyond that which spans all seven continents around the world. Our global audiences enjoy watching games at all times of day on MLB.com and our different consumer products. Cross-region replication was a very critical feature for us to implement to provide uninterrupted services to our fans.”

What Cross-Region Replication Means For Google Cloud

In the US market, Google Cloud is currently in third place, behind Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure. CEO Thomas Kurian has the goal of helping the company move to the number two spot within five years.

Cloud SQL cross-region support is a big step in that direction. It will help the company better support its customers around the world. If the company hopes to achieve its goal of becoming the number two provider in five years, it will need to compete on all levels with its two larger rivals, and this will help it do that.

For developers, this feature is a major upgrade that will make their lives easier, and greatly improve their backup and disaster recovery operations. At the same time, companies will be able to offer a seamless experience for their customers around the world.

Google Cloud
SQL
Cloud Computing
About the author
Matt Milano -Technical Writer
Matt is a tech journalist and writer with a background in web and software development.

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