Recruiters
July 7, 2020

3 Signs Job Recruiting Is Your Next Career Move

Recruiters demand individuals with a unique skillset. Looking inward at your past experiences and skills acquired might give you a better idea if recruiting is the job for you.
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Being a job recruiter, either internally for an organization, or as a headhunter for an employment agency, takes a special type of person. This is a career field that can have major bonuses or incentives financially as more candidates are hired into positions on behalf of the recruiter. While not everyone might succeed in this field, there are definitely personality attributes and overall qualities that can be advantageous when taking up a career in recruitment.  

1.   An extrovert with a Communications degree 

While some fields are primarily research-based, require long hours of independent work, and don’t revolve around too much interpersonal communication skills, being a recruiter is a profession that demands a positivist, enthusiastic demeanor pretty much every day of the job. Extroverted individuals should consider applying themselves to careers in recruiting because getting on calls daily with potential candidates won’t feel painful, and striking up friendly conversations, which is necessary to build strong connections with a potential new hire, is essential in this role.

Having a Communications degree will help. Core courses that are taught in this discipline at the undergraduate level usually revolve around the art of persuasion, public speaking (a course that is vital to helping young professionals regardless of their later industry develop a voice and know how to get a message across impactfully). Other skills that are taught at the Communications level include interpersonal communication, cross-cultural methods, as well as courses on Communications Theory and Media studies.

All of these disciplines will give young professionals thinking about entering into the Recruiter industry exposure to various concepts and strategies for how to be an effective and strategic communicator when it matters.

2.   A natural leader 

Because of the nature of recruiting and wanting candidates to recognize their own worth in a position that may feel has some ambiguity around it, or are not completely sold on the job, leadership skills can go a long way.

That’s because natural leaders, whether in the pursuit of a monetary incentive or simply because its part of their personality, understand how to lift up others in difficult situations While it may seem idealistic to say that all leaders are selfless and modest, it is more than likely that all natural are authentic to some degree. This authenticity manifests itself with candidate phone calls or Zoom calls, and helps candidates feel like that conversation they just had was unique and an “experience” in and of itself. Having a genuine or unique experience is significant for candidates in the job market, as it helps potential new hires feel like they will be seriously missing out if they pass on such an opportunity.

3.   Being able to multitask and think quickly

If you have ever worked in the service industry, where handling multiple tasks at once and dealing with many customers on any given working shift, you might have a calling for a recruiting career. This is because multitasking is a very important soft skill that often gets brushed under the rug. Multitasked need to take advantage of their abilities to juggle tasks and recognize that this skill alone could put them in a high income bracket if they make choose wisely when deciding on a career.

Interestingly, those who want to make the switch from Nursing to HR should also be cognizant of the amount of multitasking and record-keeping the nursing profession demands. The career skills needed to be a successful nurse might also checkout for a career in recruiting. A nurse, whose duties involve checking vitals, administering medication, and providing emotional support, may be very transferrable skills to recruiting— where checking in with candidates and new hires, appealing to the ethos of candidates, and of course recordkeeping as well are essential daily tasks.

In short, multitaskers should also realize that not every career professional has multitasking skills, making them a little more inelastic in terms of moving to new sectors and industries. This skill alone can be a leading factor in a major career move.

TagsJob RecruitingCareer
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJuly 7, 2020
3 Signs Job Recruiting Is Your Next Career Move
Recruiters demand individuals with a unique skillset. Looking inward at your past experiences and skills acquired might give you a better idea if recruiting is the job for you.

Being a job recruiter, either internally for an organization, or as a headhunter for an employment agency, takes a special type of person. This is a career field that can have major bonuses or incentives financially as more candidates are hired into positions on behalf of the recruiter. While not everyone might succeed in this field, there are definitely personality attributes and overall qualities that can be advantageous when taking up a career in recruitment.  

1.   An extrovert with a Communications degree 

While some fields are primarily research-based, require long hours of independent work, and don’t revolve around too much interpersonal communication skills, being a recruiter is a profession that demands a positivist, enthusiastic demeanor pretty much every day of the job. Extroverted individuals should consider applying themselves to careers in recruiting because getting on calls daily with potential candidates won’t feel painful, and striking up friendly conversations, which is necessary to build strong connections with a potential new hire, is essential in this role.

Having a Communications degree will help. Core courses that are taught in this discipline at the undergraduate level usually revolve around the art of persuasion, public speaking (a course that is vital to helping young professionals regardless of their later industry develop a voice and know how to get a message across impactfully). Other skills that are taught at the Communications level include interpersonal communication, cross-cultural methods, as well as courses on Communications Theory and Media studies.

All of these disciplines will give young professionals thinking about entering into the Recruiter industry exposure to various concepts and strategies for how to be an effective and strategic communicator when it matters.

2.   A natural leader 

Because of the nature of recruiting and wanting candidates to recognize their own worth in a position that may feel has some ambiguity around it, or are not completely sold on the job, leadership skills can go a long way.

That’s because natural leaders, whether in the pursuit of a monetary incentive or simply because its part of their personality, understand how to lift up others in difficult situations While it may seem idealistic to say that all leaders are selfless and modest, it is more than likely that all natural are authentic to some degree. This authenticity manifests itself with candidate phone calls or Zoom calls, and helps candidates feel like that conversation they just had was unique and an “experience” in and of itself. Having a genuine or unique experience is significant for candidates in the job market, as it helps potential new hires feel like they will be seriously missing out if they pass on such an opportunity.

3.   Being able to multitask and think quickly

If you have ever worked in the service industry, where handling multiple tasks at once and dealing with many customers on any given working shift, you might have a calling for a recruiting career. This is because multitasking is a very important soft skill that often gets brushed under the rug. Multitasked need to take advantage of their abilities to juggle tasks and recognize that this skill alone could put them in a high income bracket if they make choose wisely when deciding on a career.

Interestingly, those who want to make the switch from Nursing to HR should also be cognizant of the amount of multitasking and record-keeping the nursing profession demands. The career skills needed to be a successful nurse might also checkout for a career in recruiting. A nurse, whose duties involve checking vitals, administering medication, and providing emotional support, may be very transferrable skills to recruiting— where checking in with candidates and new hires, appealing to the ethos of candidates, and of course recordkeeping as well are essential daily tasks.

In short, multitaskers should also realize that not every career professional has multitasking skills, making them a little more inelastic in terms of moving to new sectors and industries. This skill alone can be a leading factor in a major career move.

Job Recruiting
Career
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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