Recruiters
July 13, 2020

3 Tips for Recruiting Gen Z

The youngest and most diverse generation in U.S. history is of course completely different than our parents generation. Here’s how recruiters can leverage top talent from this coming-of-age group.
Source: Unsplash

Millennials, which are sometimes termed the “me generation” came to age during a period of relative economic prosperity before the financial meltdown of 2008. This group of individuals, born between 1980-1994, is termed by Mckinsey and Company and others as the “me generation”. The generation has been dubbed idealistic by some, but moreover a group of ethical decision makers that has a desire to sort out some of the chaos that has been going on in the world as we’ve reached critical tipping points environmental and financial tipping points.

While millennials share some commonalities with Gen-Zers as digital natives concerned with climate change and ethical dilemmas about brand loyalty, Gen-Z, the generation that is born from 1997-2012, is more of an identitarian generation, and one of the most diverse in U.S. history.

Approximately one in four Gen-Zers is Hispanic, and 6 percent are Asian, according to studies led by the Pew Research Center. This generation has become very aware very quickly about the multidimensional aspects of identity, and are ready to defend their views on these issues in person and on online social media platforms like Instagram.

A Pew study last year found that nearly half of all Americans aged 13 to 17 said they were online “almost constantly,” and more than 90 percent used social media.

How recruiters can get through to Gen-Zers

From a recruiting perspective, the way to go about recruiting this generation is of course different and unique and presents both challenges and opportunities—just like any other generation.

Here are three major tips for recruitment techniques:

1.     Identify the difference between buzzwords and skillsets. This generation, to no fault of their own, is becoming hyper-sensitized to buzzwords in the media and online platforms. Some Gen-Zers are seeing the advantage to using buzzwords as part of their platform discerning their skillsets. It is important for recruiters to have conversations around dissecting what these words mean when they appear in resumes and LinkedIn profiles. For example, recruiters might be keen to ask candidates who are “sustainability advocates” how they have worked to promote sustainability in past professional roles.

2.     Make them aware of leadership culture. If there is anything this generation needs, it is strong leaders. The generation, which by in large has felt somewhat alienated by the amount of fragmented media coverage they receive online, combined by the stark reality of how life really works, has amounted to feelings of isolation. Covid-19 has fueled this fire as social distancing policies have kept kids coming of age inside while their brains are still developing. Those who are coming of age in this generation need to know from recruiters that the company culture they are about to enter has their backs.

3.     Work/life flow and perks. Millennials were the billboard phenoms for coming up with work/life flow routines and then idealizing them, but some in this generation have also outgrown their earlier 20s angst and are now in the middle of their careers working as much as they can. Gen-Zers on the other hand have just entered the workforce, and are trying to come to terms with a society they see as having some questionable ethics. Recruiters can attract top talent in this generation by making candidates aware of company perks such as free or discounted transportation, discounts on gym memberships, or other workshops that promote mental health and wellbeing. This generation will see these perks as part of the equity they have been primed to watch out for.

TagsGen-ZersRecruitment
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJuly 13, 2020
3 Tips for Recruiting Gen Z
The youngest and most diverse generation in U.S. history is of course completely different than our parents generation. Here’s how recruiters can leverage top talent from this coming-of-age group.

Millennials, which are sometimes termed the “me generation” came to age during a period of relative economic prosperity before the financial meltdown of 2008. This group of individuals, born between 1980-1994, is termed by Mckinsey and Company and others as the “me generation”. The generation has been dubbed idealistic by some, but moreover a group of ethical decision makers that has a desire to sort out some of the chaos that has been going on in the world as we’ve reached critical tipping points environmental and financial tipping points.

While millennials share some commonalities with Gen-Zers as digital natives concerned with climate change and ethical dilemmas about brand loyalty, Gen-Z, the generation that is born from 1997-2012, is more of an identitarian generation, and one of the most diverse in U.S. history.

Approximately one in four Gen-Zers is Hispanic, and 6 percent are Asian, according to studies led by the Pew Research Center. This generation has become very aware very quickly about the multidimensional aspects of identity, and are ready to defend their views on these issues in person and on online social media platforms like Instagram.

A Pew study last year found that nearly half of all Americans aged 13 to 17 said they were online “almost constantly,” and more than 90 percent used social media.

How recruiters can get through to Gen-Zers

From a recruiting perspective, the way to go about recruiting this generation is of course different and unique and presents both challenges and opportunities—just like any other generation.

Here are three major tips for recruitment techniques:

1.     Identify the difference between buzzwords and skillsets. This generation, to no fault of their own, is becoming hyper-sensitized to buzzwords in the media and online platforms. Some Gen-Zers are seeing the advantage to using buzzwords as part of their platform discerning their skillsets. It is important for recruiters to have conversations around dissecting what these words mean when they appear in resumes and LinkedIn profiles. For example, recruiters might be keen to ask candidates who are “sustainability advocates” how they have worked to promote sustainability in past professional roles.

2.     Make them aware of leadership culture. If there is anything this generation needs, it is strong leaders. The generation, which by in large has felt somewhat alienated by the amount of fragmented media coverage they receive online, combined by the stark reality of how life really works, has amounted to feelings of isolation. Covid-19 has fueled this fire as social distancing policies have kept kids coming of age inside while their brains are still developing. Those who are coming of age in this generation need to know from recruiters that the company culture they are about to enter has their backs.

3.     Work/life flow and perks. Millennials were the billboard phenoms for coming up with work/life flow routines and then idealizing them, but some in this generation have also outgrown their earlier 20s angst and are now in the middle of their careers working as much as they can. Gen-Zers on the other hand have just entered the workforce, and are trying to come to terms with a society they see as having some questionable ethics. Recruiters can attract top talent in this generation by making candidates aware of company perks such as free or discounted transportation, discounts on gym memberships, or other workshops that promote mental health and wellbeing. This generation will see these perks as part of the equity they have been primed to watch out for.

Gen-Zers
Recruitment
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

Related Articles