Recruiters
July 17, 2020

4 Tips For Relocating Domestic Candidates

Moving to a new U.S. city for a job comes with a lot of ambiguity. Recruiters and onboarding staff can make the transition for new hires less stressful by keeping in mind the following tips:
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1.   Bring up cultural and lifestyle fit in conversation

Besides a new salary and benefits, one of the main attractions of moving to a new city is the lifestyle and feeling the city brings with it. Different regions of the U.S. promise different lifestyles. In cities like Seattle, Portland, and Denver, nature’s highlights are just a short drive away, which offers new employees an incentive to move to these places. On the East Coast, for example New York or Boston, new hires will enjoy the 24 hour convenience of city life, major heritage sites, and other cultural events taking place in Brooklyn or in art districts.

Recruiters should highlight these aspects of cities, and make sure to do their research to see what is trending in respective cities. Candidates and new hires will need to embrace their new identities in the city they are moving to, and recruiters can assist by easing into this conversation.

2.  Make logistical arrangements and talk about perks/amenities

The logistics of moving to a new city can be stressful. Candidates, if knowing they are going to be accepted or are in the process of signing documents, should at least visit their new city once before moving there to start work. Covid-19 will make this challenging, but it is still possible and domestic airlines are operating at close to full capacity now. Recruiters should highlight areas of the city that are affordable or note which neighborhoods will be close to the office or near a major public transportation line.

With young cities, recruiters can also point out which neighborhoods have a critical mass of young professionals, as these centers of interest are often good for outdoor activities, parks, and other amenities ethnic restaurants and represent cultural hubs to take an interest in.  

Recruiters might also sell candidates on other amenities such as discounted gym classes provided by the organization or light-rail cards that make access to public transportation free. Creating this ease will help new hires familiarize with their new city.

3.  Talk about the job market/potential

Recruiters in niche sectors like technology and AI need to make candidates aware of the potential growth of an industry, if the candidate is not already aware. Having a conversation with candidates and potential new hires about the market share, the market worth, and the financials of the industry will only entice those on the other end of the phone line to move to a new city. Capital in this respect is a huge draw and great talking point for recruiters regardless of the industry.

4.  Room to move up the corporate ladder

Similarly, recruiters should make candidates aware of any statistics pertaining to an organization’s growth or opportunity in terms of scaling. Here’s a direct quote on scaling an organization from Will Meehan, co-author of Engine of Impact: Essentials of Strategic Leadership in the Non-profit sector:

         “…these organizations are poised to scale, They need to assemble the essential   elements of strategic management—recruiting talented executives and staff     members, attracting steady support from donors, and mastering the art of board   governance.”

When recruiters talk about their donors and board governance in a positive light to candidates, it lets them know and understand the opportunities at play in an organization and the room for organizational growth. It is a great tactic for recruiters who need to sell the worth of start-ups in particular. People like to hear about leadership in this regard.

TagsRelocating Candidates
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJuly 17, 2020
4 Tips For Relocating Domestic Candidates
Moving to a new U.S. city for a job comes with a lot of ambiguity. Recruiters and onboarding staff can make the transition for new hires less stressful by keeping in mind the following tips:

1.   Bring up cultural and lifestyle fit in conversation

Besides a new salary and benefits, one of the main attractions of moving to a new city is the lifestyle and feeling the city brings with it. Different regions of the U.S. promise different lifestyles. In cities like Seattle, Portland, and Denver, nature’s highlights are just a short drive away, which offers new employees an incentive to move to these places. On the East Coast, for example New York or Boston, new hires will enjoy the 24 hour convenience of city life, major heritage sites, and other cultural events taking place in Brooklyn or in art districts.

Recruiters should highlight these aspects of cities, and make sure to do their research to see what is trending in respective cities. Candidates and new hires will need to embrace their new identities in the city they are moving to, and recruiters can assist by easing into this conversation.

2.  Make logistical arrangements and talk about perks/amenities

The logistics of moving to a new city can be stressful. Candidates, if knowing they are going to be accepted or are in the process of signing documents, should at least visit their new city once before moving there to start work. Covid-19 will make this challenging, but it is still possible and domestic airlines are operating at close to full capacity now. Recruiters should highlight areas of the city that are affordable or note which neighborhoods will be close to the office or near a major public transportation line.

With young cities, recruiters can also point out which neighborhoods have a critical mass of young professionals, as these centers of interest are often good for outdoor activities, parks, and other amenities ethnic restaurants and represent cultural hubs to take an interest in.  

Recruiters might also sell candidates on other amenities such as discounted gym classes provided by the organization or light-rail cards that make access to public transportation free. Creating this ease will help new hires familiarize with their new city.

3.  Talk about the job market/potential

Recruiters in niche sectors like technology and AI need to make candidates aware of the potential growth of an industry, if the candidate is not already aware. Having a conversation with candidates and potential new hires about the market share, the market worth, and the financials of the industry will only entice those on the other end of the phone line to move to a new city. Capital in this respect is a huge draw and great talking point for recruiters regardless of the industry.

4.  Room to move up the corporate ladder

Similarly, recruiters should make candidates aware of any statistics pertaining to an organization’s growth or opportunity in terms of scaling. Here’s a direct quote on scaling an organization from Will Meehan, co-author of Engine of Impact: Essentials of Strategic Leadership in the Non-profit sector:

         “…these organizations are poised to scale, They need to assemble the essential   elements of strategic management—recruiting talented executives and staff     members, attracting steady support from donors, and mastering the art of board   governance.”

When recruiters talk about their donors and board governance in a positive light to candidates, it lets them know and understand the opportunities at play in an organization and the room for organizational growth. It is a great tactic for recruiters who need to sell the worth of start-ups in particular. People like to hear about leadership in this regard.

Relocating
Candidates
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

Related Articles