Recruiters
July 10, 2020

An Inside Look at Growth and Demand in the AI Industry

Let’s take a look at statistical analysis of the current trends inside AI specialty positions.
Source: Unsplash

A LinkedIn Senior Data Scientist found that, “AI job applications dropped 14.1 percent during the ten weeks after COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S., compared to the 10 weeks prior, when normalized against overall job postings.” She also noted that, “…contrary to such a slowdown in overall job listings for AI specialist roles, YOY growth rate in the software & IT sector, typically with the highest demand for such talent, increased during the post-COVID period relative to the pre-COVID period.

She mentions that the AI specialist sector has fared pretty well in the face of Covid-19, creating the perspective of how fast this field is growing, despite a decreasing growth rate over a fraction of a year.

This leaves some room for analysis about how a decreasing growth rate is both relative to the industry of AI and to the larger job market (on an online platform) in general.

Logistics Perspective and International Applications

This brings to mind at least one reason for the decreasing growth in AI specialist jobs, which does not represent an absolute decrease but only one relative to the curve of this industry. This is foreign hires and international applicants. One reason while the number of total job applications decreased in a 10-week post COVID scenario might be due to the fact that there were less international applicants who wanted to risk even being able to travel for an interview or new hire position.

This logistics perspective makes sense considering the fact that airline sales for the second quarter dropped by 95% or more for several major airlines including Qatar, Emirates, and others.

Also, from a domestic perspective, there is a clustering of AI specialist jobs in select “tech” cities, such as San Francisco and increasingly Venice Beach in Los Angeles. The researcher who made the above findings is also located in the San Francisco area. It makes sense that applications might drop because domestic U.S. nationals who are unable to fly for a job interview, or are unwilling to apply because they know they would never be able to find an apartment amid the current economic crisis, Covid-19, which encompasses a real estate crisis.

Hopefuls and Optimism for the AI Specialist Field

Another major key point made in LinkedIn’s work with regard to the AI issue is that adoption rate, and I would also mention pure interest and affinity for AI in todays modern world and digital interest, is only growing. Regardless of the speed-bump that has manifested as the Covid-19 crisis, AI will surely rebound and there are other statistical examples that paint a picture of how this might happen.

We can take for instance the 2008 financial crisis and the effects this worldwide moment had on CO2 emissions. While it might seem like a far away example, the statistics are relevant.     

There was a brief period where, after the 1990s and early 2000s, a similar decreasing growth rate of CO2 emissions appeared in the aftermath of 2008. People were driving less and businesses were shut down. However, now looking back at the data, it is clear that this decreasing growth rate soon became a steadily increasing growth rate once the economy liberalized again.

This is a good historical lesson for how economic and political crises moreover cause speed bumps, but the overall trajectory of an industry that was already on course to grow, does.

One potential area of interest it might be for forecasters looking at whether AI will rebound or not is understanding how many more people are relying on their mobile smartphones with the advent of Covid-19. If more people are finding more usages for Apps and new digital lifestyle habits during this period of staying-home, that might mean a corresponding uptick for developers and those working in tech to employ new AI for their programs in mobile applications. This would result in an eventual increase in the demand for AI specialty jobs, dictated by adoption behaviors.

TagsAI IndustryCovid-19Jobs
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJuly 10, 2020
An Inside Look at Growth and Demand in the AI Industry
Let’s take a look at statistical analysis of the current trends inside AI specialty positions.

A LinkedIn Senior Data Scientist found that, “AI job applications dropped 14.1 percent during the ten weeks after COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S., compared to the 10 weeks prior, when normalized against overall job postings.” She also noted that, “…contrary to such a slowdown in overall job listings for AI specialist roles, YOY growth rate in the software & IT sector, typically with the highest demand for such talent, increased during the post-COVID period relative to the pre-COVID period.

She mentions that the AI specialist sector has fared pretty well in the face of Covid-19, creating the perspective of how fast this field is growing, despite a decreasing growth rate over a fraction of a year.

This leaves some room for analysis about how a decreasing growth rate is both relative to the industry of AI and to the larger job market (on an online platform) in general.

Logistics Perspective and International Applications

This brings to mind at least one reason for the decreasing growth in AI specialist jobs, which does not represent an absolute decrease but only one relative to the curve of this industry. This is foreign hires and international applicants. One reason while the number of total job applications decreased in a 10-week post COVID scenario might be due to the fact that there were less international applicants who wanted to risk even being able to travel for an interview or new hire position.

This logistics perspective makes sense considering the fact that airline sales for the second quarter dropped by 95% or more for several major airlines including Qatar, Emirates, and others.

Also, from a domestic perspective, there is a clustering of AI specialist jobs in select “tech” cities, such as San Francisco and increasingly Venice Beach in Los Angeles. The researcher who made the above findings is also located in the San Francisco area. It makes sense that applications might drop because domestic U.S. nationals who are unable to fly for a job interview, or are unwilling to apply because they know they would never be able to find an apartment amid the current economic crisis, Covid-19, which encompasses a real estate crisis.

Hopefuls and Optimism for the AI Specialist Field

Another major key point made in LinkedIn’s work with regard to the AI issue is that adoption rate, and I would also mention pure interest and affinity for AI in todays modern world and digital interest, is only growing. Regardless of the speed-bump that has manifested as the Covid-19 crisis, AI will surely rebound and there are other statistical examples that paint a picture of how this might happen.

We can take for instance the 2008 financial crisis and the effects this worldwide moment had on CO2 emissions. While it might seem like a far away example, the statistics are relevant.     

There was a brief period where, after the 1990s and early 2000s, a similar decreasing growth rate of CO2 emissions appeared in the aftermath of 2008. People were driving less and businesses were shut down. However, now looking back at the data, it is clear that this decreasing growth rate soon became a steadily increasing growth rate once the economy liberalized again.

This is a good historical lesson for how economic and political crises moreover cause speed bumps, but the overall trajectory of an industry that was already on course to grow, does.

One potential area of interest it might be for forecasters looking at whether AI will rebound or not is understanding how many more people are relying on their mobile smartphones with the advent of Covid-19. If more people are finding more usages for Apps and new digital lifestyle habits during this period of staying-home, that might mean a corresponding uptick for developers and those working in tech to employ new AI for their programs in mobile applications. This would result in an eventual increase in the demand for AI specialty jobs, dictated by adoption behaviors.

AI Industry
Covid-19
Jobs
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

Related Articles