Recruiters
June 17, 2020

How Many Interviews Should a Web Developer Go Through?

Web developers are in high demand due to todays digital marketplace of applications and new tools that making doing business easier. So what are the key attributes of a successful developer?
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Web developers represent a pretty niche market. They are specialized in coding, in designing Apps for iPhones and Androids, for working on the back-end and front-end of websites, and coming up with algorithms that enhance key features on the programs we love and use as a society.

When conducting some research, I found that the hiring process for full-time web developer roles can be quite extensive. One candidate living in Jersey City mentioned that he always dreamed of having a full-time developer position in Manhattan, but getting to that point in his career was incredibly difficult. He told me when he was applying to jobs, trying to support his wife at the time, he was often competing with over 100 candidates for one opening. When he finally got an offer with a major software technology firm, he told me that his onboarding process was 45 days long.  

I wondered how someone could enjoy working for a firm with an onboarding process that was so lengthy. It seemed like the entire thing was a bit overwhelming, and the stress that would amount during a such a process seemed to be a lot compared to other industries where onboarding procedures might take one or two days.

What the recruiters are looking for

Such onboarding processes, including the interviews to get there—usually imply a few things that an organization is looking for, especially for web developers. Unlike other sectors like marketing, editorial work, or the arts, interviewing for positions in the web development sphere is highly based on KPIs and a candidates experience handling these KPIs on deadline, with a proven track record.

The initial phone screening will test a candidate’s knowledge on whether or not they were able to perform in past roles, and whether or not their performance, according to such KPIs that are subliminal in the screening, are good enough for the organization in question. This is a way for employers and recruiters to know that the budget being allocated for potential candidates is going into the right hands.

Technology firms, and SMEs more generally operate with smaller budgets than corporations or large financial institutions, so while it may be easier to get a job in these sectors, especially through great networking and being friends with the boss, that is not the same for technology and web development recruiting.

Cultural Fit

That’s why the second round or even third round of interviews is all about cultural fit and a candidate’s ability to have some charisma or charm that goes the extra mile in the interview. Some of the tools recruiters can use to judge whether or not a candidate has the right cultural fit is looking up their profiles on a social network, although this has been met with some controversy in other blogs that attest social network profiles might be outdated or not really represent what a candidate is like when they are on the clock.

Interpersonal and EQ Skills

Regardless if the position is remote or not, candidates need to have interpersonal skills. Recruiters can use some tools like ResearchGate to see if the candidate has written anything about a topic, and how they vest their time in specific interests. Emotional intelligence goes a long way throughout the job process, as recruiters want to know if the candidate is mentally fit for a position that be extensively online and thus can induce fatigue quickly.

Recruiters can use tools like social networking, in this sense at least, to see where the candidate has been, what cities they have worked in, and how exposed they are to different cultures and experiences. Harvard Business Review also posts some great questions for recruiters to look at when screening for emotional intelligence. While a coder may not interact with other workers as much, recruiters still want to know, or at least gage, what their EQ score might based on the following questions: 

  • Can you tell me about a time when your mood affected your performance, either negatively or positively?
  • Tell me about a conflict you had with a peer, direct report, or boss–how did it start and how did it get resolved?
  • A manager has to maintain a productive, positive tone even when she’s anxious about a business threat. How have you been able to do this in previous positions?
TagsWeb DeveloperInterviews
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJune 17, 2020
How Many Interviews Should a Web Developer Go Through?
Web developers are in high demand due to todays digital marketplace of applications and new tools that making doing business easier. So what are the key attributes of a successful developer?

Web developers represent a pretty niche market. They are specialized in coding, in designing Apps for iPhones and Androids, for working on the back-end and front-end of websites, and coming up with algorithms that enhance key features on the programs we love and use as a society.

When conducting some research, I found that the hiring process for full-time web developer roles can be quite extensive. One candidate living in Jersey City mentioned that he always dreamed of having a full-time developer position in Manhattan, but getting to that point in his career was incredibly difficult. He told me when he was applying to jobs, trying to support his wife at the time, he was often competing with over 100 candidates for one opening. When he finally got an offer with a major software technology firm, he told me that his onboarding process was 45 days long.  

I wondered how someone could enjoy working for a firm with an onboarding process that was so lengthy. It seemed like the entire thing was a bit overwhelming, and the stress that would amount during a such a process seemed to be a lot compared to other industries where onboarding procedures might take one or two days.

What the recruiters are looking for

Such onboarding processes, including the interviews to get there—usually imply a few things that an organization is looking for, especially for web developers. Unlike other sectors like marketing, editorial work, or the arts, interviewing for positions in the web development sphere is highly based on KPIs and a candidates experience handling these KPIs on deadline, with a proven track record.

The initial phone screening will test a candidate’s knowledge on whether or not they were able to perform in past roles, and whether or not their performance, according to such KPIs that are subliminal in the screening, are good enough for the organization in question. This is a way for employers and recruiters to know that the budget being allocated for potential candidates is going into the right hands.

Technology firms, and SMEs more generally operate with smaller budgets than corporations or large financial institutions, so while it may be easier to get a job in these sectors, especially through great networking and being friends with the boss, that is not the same for technology and web development recruiting.

Cultural Fit

That’s why the second round or even third round of interviews is all about cultural fit and a candidate’s ability to have some charisma or charm that goes the extra mile in the interview. Some of the tools recruiters can use to judge whether or not a candidate has the right cultural fit is looking up their profiles on a social network, although this has been met with some controversy in other blogs that attest social network profiles might be outdated or not really represent what a candidate is like when they are on the clock.

Interpersonal and EQ Skills

Regardless if the position is remote or not, candidates need to have interpersonal skills. Recruiters can use some tools like ResearchGate to see if the candidate has written anything about a topic, and how they vest their time in specific interests. Emotional intelligence goes a long way throughout the job process, as recruiters want to know if the candidate is mentally fit for a position that be extensively online and thus can induce fatigue quickly.

Recruiters can use tools like social networking, in this sense at least, to see where the candidate has been, what cities they have worked in, and how exposed they are to different cultures and experiences. Harvard Business Review also posts some great questions for recruiters to look at when screening for emotional intelligence. While a coder may not interact with other workers as much, recruiters still want to know, or at least gage, what their EQ score might based on the following questions: 

  • Can you tell me about a time when your mood affected your performance, either negatively or positively?
  • Tell me about a conflict you had with a peer, direct report, or boss–how did it start and how did it get resolved?
  • A manager has to maintain a productive, positive tone even when she’s anxious about a business threat. How have you been able to do this in previous positions?
Web Developer
Interviews
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

Related Articles