Recruiters
July 4, 2020

How Online Courses Help in the Recruitment Process

Although they might feel open-ended and without clear deadlines, those who are self-disciplined and willful can benefit from online courses.
Source: Unpslash

As an undergraduate, it can be difficult finding the perfect major that matches exactly what you want to do for the rest of your life. In most cases, undergraduate students do not declare their major until at least their sophomore or junior year. In the process, most higher education institutions require students to take prerequisite classes, classes that are mandatory but might not fully relate to the jobs or skills that a student needs to be successful in their early professional career.

This is part of the money making apparatus of universities. Introductory classes and tenured professors might teach classes that have little or no relevancy to the current job market a student is interested in investing their time in, but the courses still need to be completed and the credits marked.

This does present a problem with modern day educational systems in the U.S., as students can graduate with a degree from a 4-year university and still need additional training, internships, and much more to be considered competitive in their field. Blaming the universities might be warranted but the skills economy is also changing rapidly, and in order to re-skill in a quick and convenient manner at a lower cost, some options might need to be exhausted.

Online Courses and Learning

There is some stigma against taking an online course. Critics say it is too difficult to stay engaged when trying to take a course in a home environment and that the classroom setting is more stimulating and interactive. Others simply put off taking an online course until its too late—they see the option as permanently available on their MacBook, but don’t feel the need to start at any particular time since most online courses can be taken on a rolling basis.

Regardless, taking an online course can be a humbling and highly professional experience that gives participants access to new knowledge and ideas and ways of thinking. If the point of education is to enhance someone’s cognitive ability to think, then the online course should be able to deliver on that if taken seriously enough.

Some tips for having a conducive environment for your online course:

  • Try to strategically set aside 2-3 hours a few times a week to go through lesson plans, videos, and online quizzes. Make sure your phone is turned off and in a separate room to avoid distractions
  • Take notes and approach virtual lecturing with the same legitimacy you would in a real classroom setting
  • If the course has an unlimited time period, make sure you are being consistent and diligent with how often you attend online lectures
  • Don’t rush through or skip lectures

Applying online learning to your resume and interviewing

While non-traditional and novel in its approach to learning, online classes can be utilized by participants if they know how to market themselves well and come up with major thematic learning points that were taught in their online course.

For your resume, one important feature that should be noted about the online course is not just the title, but also the guiding institution that provides the course. If it is from a reputable university, such as Stanford, this information needs to go on the resume. Recruiters will see that the university provides the course and will hold it to a higher degree.  

For individuals who have finished their online courses and are in active interviewing stages, being strategic about the skills you learned is seriously important. If you took an online course specifically to apply to a series of companies that are highly technical, you might as well say this in the interview. Candidates who go the extra mile by making it apparent that they invested their time in an online course while juggling other responsibilities are seen as competent and mature, and this can make a huge difference in interviewing and impressing recruiters.  

Overall, the online course adds a dimension of resilience for candidates, in that they did not give up in lacking technical skills, but rather exhausted their options, found a decent online course, and paid attention to the skills they needed to learn instead of applying to jobs without such skills. Recruiters will see this and understand that candidates supplementing their traditional degree programs with supplementary online courses amounts to going the extra mile.

TagsOnline CoursesRecruitmentOnline Learning
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJuly 4, 2020
How Online Courses Help in the Recruitment Process
Although they might feel open-ended and without clear deadlines, those who are self-disciplined and willful can benefit from online courses.

As an undergraduate, it can be difficult finding the perfect major that matches exactly what you want to do for the rest of your life. In most cases, undergraduate students do not declare their major until at least their sophomore or junior year. In the process, most higher education institutions require students to take prerequisite classes, classes that are mandatory but might not fully relate to the jobs or skills that a student needs to be successful in their early professional career.

This is part of the money making apparatus of universities. Introductory classes and tenured professors might teach classes that have little or no relevancy to the current job market a student is interested in investing their time in, but the courses still need to be completed and the credits marked.

This does present a problem with modern day educational systems in the U.S., as students can graduate with a degree from a 4-year university and still need additional training, internships, and much more to be considered competitive in their field. Blaming the universities might be warranted but the skills economy is also changing rapidly, and in order to re-skill in a quick and convenient manner at a lower cost, some options might need to be exhausted.

Online Courses and Learning

There is some stigma against taking an online course. Critics say it is too difficult to stay engaged when trying to take a course in a home environment and that the classroom setting is more stimulating and interactive. Others simply put off taking an online course until its too late—they see the option as permanently available on their MacBook, but don’t feel the need to start at any particular time since most online courses can be taken on a rolling basis.

Regardless, taking an online course can be a humbling and highly professional experience that gives participants access to new knowledge and ideas and ways of thinking. If the point of education is to enhance someone’s cognitive ability to think, then the online course should be able to deliver on that if taken seriously enough.

Some tips for having a conducive environment for your online course:

  • Try to strategically set aside 2-3 hours a few times a week to go through lesson plans, videos, and online quizzes. Make sure your phone is turned off and in a separate room to avoid distractions
  • Take notes and approach virtual lecturing with the same legitimacy you would in a real classroom setting
  • If the course has an unlimited time period, make sure you are being consistent and diligent with how often you attend online lectures
  • Don’t rush through or skip lectures

Applying online learning to your resume and interviewing

While non-traditional and novel in its approach to learning, online classes can be utilized by participants if they know how to market themselves well and come up with major thematic learning points that were taught in their online course.

For your resume, one important feature that should be noted about the online course is not just the title, but also the guiding institution that provides the course. If it is from a reputable university, such as Stanford, this information needs to go on the resume. Recruiters will see that the university provides the course and will hold it to a higher degree.  

For individuals who have finished their online courses and are in active interviewing stages, being strategic about the skills you learned is seriously important. If you took an online course specifically to apply to a series of companies that are highly technical, you might as well say this in the interview. Candidates who go the extra mile by making it apparent that they invested their time in an online course while juggling other responsibilities are seen as competent and mature, and this can make a huge difference in interviewing and impressing recruiters.  

Overall, the online course adds a dimension of resilience for candidates, in that they did not give up in lacking technical skills, but rather exhausted their options, found a decent online course, and paid attention to the skills they needed to learn instead of applying to jobs without such skills. Recruiters will see this and understand that candidates supplementing their traditional degree programs with supplementary online courses amounts to going the extra mile.

Online Courses
Recruitment
Online Learning
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

Related Articles