Recruiters
July 8, 2020

How Recruiting Practices differ for Small and Large Organizations

Name brand organizations have a totally different approach to hiring these days.
Source: Unsplash

In the midst of Covid-19, the U.S. has really seen some companies shine in their response to the pandemic while others have developed a bad reputation. Amazon, for example, was under heat for overworking factory employees who may or may not have contracted Covid-19 in the warehouse while they were also not being compensated for overtime pay. Other major organizations like Twitter set a precedent early on that placed employer safety and security in terms of remote working flexibility and built a new model for how to deal with employee relations during such a stressful economic period.

Smaller organizations did not receive much of a buzz, as there is little publicity surrounding companies that do not have such a global reach, at least from an editorial perspective.  

As such, one of the main differences between small and large organizations is that, pandemic or not, large organizations have more public affiliation and are more well-known in the public spotlight. This affects recruiting processes as well. It’s one of the reasons when recruiters are working for or representing top agencies and major organizations, they don’t have to sell candidates as much on the culture and environment of the place in question. Chances are candidates have already read up or have been following the cultural history of that organization for a long time. Google is the perfect example of a company that candidates are so excited to work in part because of how publicity and coverage surrounding Google’s image over the years has made it such a hallmark in the tech industry.  

Smaller Organizations and Job Perks 

On the flip side, recruiters working to schedule candidates interviews with hiring managers of small firms need to develop relationships a little bit more and game the system. They need to be more personable and make the application and interview process into an experience. Candidates who might be hired at a small organization might face more ambiguity surrounding the company culture because it is such a small team, to begin with and recruiters need to make it known that the small size will not affect the security of their position. 

Candidates can also feel ambiguity with larger organizations, but in this light, the pressure is taken off from the recruiting side as this ambiguity is replaced with an eagerness to “work for a big name” that might not be the case when dealing with a startup or smaller organization.

Because smaller organizations also offer smaller salaries relatively speaking, recruiters need to do a good job of talking up other perks and benefits of the job, including logistics, flexibility, PTO, and other features of the company. Big companies are famous for having a ping pong table and Kombucha on tap for employees to enjoy in their downtime. The question is how can recruiters create that same feeling of pleasure with a small organization?

What else do the big guys look for in their recruiting process 

Larger organizations also have bigger budgets in their HR departments, rely less on intuitive hiring (which might be the case for small organizations who need to hire someone quickly to keep their operations afloat), and take into account structured behavioral interviews.

Apple, for example, due to having such a high volume of customers in some of their key downtown locations, such as their Atlantic Avenue store in Brooklyn, New York, tend to hire people with personality and enthusiasm, rather than those who know the most about products.  

Meanwhile, Google specifically hosts interviews with candidates asking them to cite previous experiences as evidence for certain personality characteristics.

These highly targeted approaches are more scientific for bigger organizations and employ behavioral economic data to make decisions of the best-fit candidate. This costs time and money that large organizations can afford. Whereas for smaller organizations, there is more leniency and also more of an ability for candidates to really express themselves and what they are looking for in a respective position.

This ultimately modifies the jobs of recruiters everywhere, who either have to engage in selling the position to a candidate in the case of smaller organizations or perhaps take more of a back seat role because the candidate is already so enthused by the image of the company.

TagsRecruiting PracticesOrganizationsJob Perks
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJuly 8, 2020
How Recruiting Practices differ for Small and Large Organizations
Name brand organizations have a totally different approach to hiring these days.

In the midst of Covid-19, the U.S. has really seen some companies shine in their response to the pandemic while others have developed a bad reputation. Amazon, for example, was under heat for overworking factory employees who may or may not have contracted Covid-19 in the warehouse while they were also not being compensated for overtime pay. Other major organizations like Twitter set a precedent early on that placed employer safety and security in terms of remote working flexibility and built a new model for how to deal with employee relations during such a stressful economic period.

Smaller organizations did not receive much of a buzz, as there is little publicity surrounding companies that do not have such a global reach, at least from an editorial perspective.  

As such, one of the main differences between small and large organizations is that, pandemic or not, large organizations have more public affiliation and are more well-known in the public spotlight. This affects recruiting processes as well. It’s one of the reasons when recruiters are working for or representing top agencies and major organizations, they don’t have to sell candidates as much on the culture and environment of the place in question. Chances are candidates have already read up or have been following the cultural history of that organization for a long time. Google is the perfect example of a company that candidates are so excited to work in part because of how publicity and coverage surrounding Google’s image over the years has made it such a hallmark in the tech industry.  

Smaller Organizations and Job Perks 

On the flip side, recruiters working to schedule candidates interviews with hiring managers of small firms need to develop relationships a little bit more and game the system. They need to be more personable and make the application and interview process into an experience. Candidates who might be hired at a small organization might face more ambiguity surrounding the company culture because it is such a small team, to begin with and recruiters need to make it known that the small size will not affect the security of their position. 

Candidates can also feel ambiguity with larger organizations, but in this light, the pressure is taken off from the recruiting side as this ambiguity is replaced with an eagerness to “work for a big name” that might not be the case when dealing with a startup or smaller organization.

Because smaller organizations also offer smaller salaries relatively speaking, recruiters need to do a good job of talking up other perks and benefits of the job, including logistics, flexibility, PTO, and other features of the company. Big companies are famous for having a ping pong table and Kombucha on tap for employees to enjoy in their downtime. The question is how can recruiters create that same feeling of pleasure with a small organization?

What else do the big guys look for in their recruiting process 

Larger organizations also have bigger budgets in their HR departments, rely less on intuitive hiring (which might be the case for small organizations who need to hire someone quickly to keep their operations afloat), and take into account structured behavioral interviews.

Apple, for example, due to having such a high volume of customers in some of their key downtown locations, such as their Atlantic Avenue store in Brooklyn, New York, tend to hire people with personality and enthusiasm, rather than those who know the most about products.  

Meanwhile, Google specifically hosts interviews with candidates asking them to cite previous experiences as evidence for certain personality characteristics.

These highly targeted approaches are more scientific for bigger organizations and employ behavioral economic data to make decisions of the best-fit candidate. This costs time and money that large organizations can afford. Whereas for smaller organizations, there is more leniency and also more of an ability for candidates to really express themselves and what they are looking for in a respective position.

This ultimately modifies the jobs of recruiters everywhere, who either have to engage in selling the position to a candidate in the case of smaller organizations or perhaps take more of a back seat role because the candidate is already so enthused by the image of the company.

Recruiting Practices
Organizations
Job Perks
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

Related Articles