Recruiters
July 9, 2020

How the Recruiting Landscape Has Changed Post-Pandemic

The demand sided shock to the U.S. economy has left executives everywhere rethinking how they want to do business. In turn, recruiters are paying attention to market trends and re-skilling so they can keep doing their job.
Source: Unsplash

Covid-19 has no doubt changed the recruiting landscape in recent months. This pandemic with respect to organizational culture and the furloughing of employees has caused a demand-sided crisis, leaving managers and executives to reconsider how many people they need on their staff full-time, and cutting the fat of their operations to operate as lean as possible.  

This demand sided crisis has not only affected organizational culture, but has also rippled into the jobs of recruiters everywhere, who have felt higher stakes to perform when less companies are hiring and the roles that are being sought at the corporate level have become even more competitive.

The effects of less demand

Just because there is less demand for positions in the U.S. economy does not mean the work of recruiters has become obsolete. It really just means that the job, and career track of these individuals has changed fundamentally. Corporations will now save thousands of dollars by having video chats with clients instead of flying executives to exotic locations for a meet and greet. More employees will enjoy their commute-less work from home scenario and become gurus with new software and computer programs. This will result in a shift in the skills economy—something that is already underway.

Recruiters will simply have to follow these trends, and understand the software and database skills that are becoming top-tier for companies during this time period. Those recruiters who will gain an edge in this economy are the ones doing their own research to see how major companies are adopting new technologies, and then will peruse resumes and LinkedIn profiles for candidates who specialize in one sector—but have supplementary CS skills.  

Given that these trends might last for a long time, it’s a good idea for recruiters to do this research sooner rather than later.

Thus the effects of less demand also represent a shift on the demand curve, whereby skills that were not so important in 2019 are now crucial for making executives happy and content with their own operations.

In this light, recruiters who use unconventional tactics might be successful in these challenging times. Instead of looking for traditional markers of success like where one went to university, recruiters should peruse to the very bottom of resumes to see how other skills might make a candidate a complete asset for a job. During the current economic situation, this is becoming more important than ever.

For example looking at extracurricular or non-traditional roles or internships as a recruiter in today’s job market is essential. This is because when candidates show their worth as being able to thrive in internships and other non-traditional positions, it is a marker of resilience.

Finding Quality Hires

On this front, finding quality hires for companies will not be as easy as it was before the pandemic. This is not the fault of the recruiter, but a symptom of picky executives who are worried about budgeting. Recruiters might have to intuitively make decisions now about who they are passing along to hiring managers or they might have to engage candidates more than ever before to understand their motivations for applying to companies.  

Passive recruiting will become a thing of the past.

Again, this does not mean quality hires are not out there. It really just means recruiters and executives need to re-think how a new employee is going to affect organizational culture at this point.

This also suggests that organizations aught to be flexible with years of experience a candidate has on their resume. This pandemic should be a time when taking someone with 4 years of experience instead of 5 is viable if the former is the right fit.  

 

These are the questions that executives, but also recruiters will have to gamble with, and make sense of in the coming months. Momentum from both sides is needed to reshape how we think about hiring in the future.

TagsCovid-19RecruitingRecruiting Landscape
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJuly 9, 2020
How the Recruiting Landscape Has Changed Post-Pandemic
The demand sided shock to the U.S. economy has left executives everywhere rethinking how they want to do business. In turn, recruiters are paying attention to market trends and re-skilling so they can keep doing their job.

Covid-19 has no doubt changed the recruiting landscape in recent months. This pandemic with respect to organizational culture and the furloughing of employees has caused a demand-sided crisis, leaving managers and executives to reconsider how many people they need on their staff full-time, and cutting the fat of their operations to operate as lean as possible.  

This demand sided crisis has not only affected organizational culture, but has also rippled into the jobs of recruiters everywhere, who have felt higher stakes to perform when less companies are hiring and the roles that are being sought at the corporate level have become even more competitive.

The effects of less demand

Just because there is less demand for positions in the U.S. economy does not mean the work of recruiters has become obsolete. It really just means that the job, and career track of these individuals has changed fundamentally. Corporations will now save thousands of dollars by having video chats with clients instead of flying executives to exotic locations for a meet and greet. More employees will enjoy their commute-less work from home scenario and become gurus with new software and computer programs. This will result in a shift in the skills economy—something that is already underway.

Recruiters will simply have to follow these trends, and understand the software and database skills that are becoming top-tier for companies during this time period. Those recruiters who will gain an edge in this economy are the ones doing their own research to see how major companies are adopting new technologies, and then will peruse resumes and LinkedIn profiles for candidates who specialize in one sector—but have supplementary CS skills.  

Given that these trends might last for a long time, it’s a good idea for recruiters to do this research sooner rather than later.

Thus the effects of less demand also represent a shift on the demand curve, whereby skills that were not so important in 2019 are now crucial for making executives happy and content with their own operations.

In this light, recruiters who use unconventional tactics might be successful in these challenging times. Instead of looking for traditional markers of success like where one went to university, recruiters should peruse to the very bottom of resumes to see how other skills might make a candidate a complete asset for a job. During the current economic situation, this is becoming more important than ever.

For example looking at extracurricular or non-traditional roles or internships as a recruiter in today’s job market is essential. This is because when candidates show their worth as being able to thrive in internships and other non-traditional positions, it is a marker of resilience.

Finding Quality Hires

On this front, finding quality hires for companies will not be as easy as it was before the pandemic. This is not the fault of the recruiter, but a symptom of picky executives who are worried about budgeting. Recruiters might have to intuitively make decisions now about who they are passing along to hiring managers or they might have to engage candidates more than ever before to understand their motivations for applying to companies.  

Passive recruiting will become a thing of the past.

Again, this does not mean quality hires are not out there. It really just means recruiters and executives need to re-think how a new employee is going to affect organizational culture at this point.

This also suggests that organizations aught to be flexible with years of experience a candidate has on their resume. This pandemic should be a time when taking someone with 4 years of experience instead of 5 is viable if the former is the right fit.  

 

These are the questions that executives, but also recruiters will have to gamble with, and make sense of in the coming months. Momentum from both sides is needed to reshape how we think about hiring in the future.

Covid-19
Recruiting
Recruiting Landscape
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

Related Articles