Recruiters
June 30, 2020

Top 3 Benefits for Web Developers in 2020

This high demand career track has plenty of perks to offer.
Source: Unsplash

If you own your own business, chances are you’ll need to have a decent website to appear credible for your customers and the larger community you’re catering toward. Websites present challenges and opportunities for businesses, however large or small they may be. This is because businesses today have to allocate funds for a web developer because it is a highly specialized skill that cannot be done by somebody with little to no experience. Businesses face a direct opportunity cost when deciding how much time and money they want to invest in their website development.

Some businesses skip hiring a web developer altogether, thus cutting costs and trying to get by with an Instagram page that is promoting the goods and services they provide. This however, can be problematic, especially when Instagram accounts need to be backed up to company websites and portals for payment. 

These are just some of the reasons why web development is in such high demand. Building out features on a new website requires a web developer, and in order for companies to compete at the firm level, they need to have a functional website that does not detract from their overall image. In 2018 alone, web development was in the 8th spot for Best Technology Jobs as part of the U.S. News & World Report that year. In the same year, US News reported that the median salary for web developers was $69,430. The best-paid 25 percent made $95,020 that year, while the lowest-paid 25 percent made $50,990.

So, clearly, the first major benefit of being a web developer is the security it provides in terms of salary and ability to live in major U.S. cities affordably. Web developers know clients will pay their price if they have no other options.

But lets get to some of the more precise details of what being a web developer looks like so we can better understand other benefits individuals in this profession seek out: 

Daily working schedules

Bethanne Zink is a web developer based in New York City who has reported via SkillCrush what her daily working responsibilities entail. She is an alumni of the 3 month web development program at the Flatiron School. She describes her working day as really starting around 10am and spending a little more than half of her day building out features on clients websites, but also approximately 40 percent of her time delegating tasks to other team members and troubleshooting with team members who “get stuck” with coding problems.

While Bethanne is a team lead and has an exciting career, she often works on the weekends and finds herself helping clients almost every day of the week because there is always work to do. This means that web development jobs can be full of creative pursuits when it comes to building out features, but if project managers get fatigued with helping everyone else and become extra-milers, there needs to be some added benefit for doing this kind of work.

This is where company culture comes in. Recalling a trip to the San Jose area last year, it was common to go to the Whole Foods outdoor patio around dinner time and find groups of co-workers sitting with their laptops and a meal, some with drinks chatting away and others intent on working into the nighttime. To some, this lifestyle is appealing and one of the major added benefits of working in this sector is being around like-minded individuals who feel good to be around whether its at lunchtime or 7 o’clock at night.

This also ties into the 3rd benefit of working as a web developer which are the perks that come with long working hours, such as generous paid time off (PTO) and also other add-ons like discounted gym memberships, transportation discounts and credits, and other services that make life easier, especially for urbanites. While not everyone will be able to work as a web developer for the New York Times or Airbnb, the sector in general compensates its web development employees with perks to safeguard against burnout.

TagsBenefitsWeb Developers
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJune 30, 2020
Top 3 Benefits for Web Developers in 2020
This high demand career track has plenty of perks to offer.

If you own your own business, chances are you’ll need to have a decent website to appear credible for your customers and the larger community you’re catering toward. Websites present challenges and opportunities for businesses, however large or small they may be. This is because businesses today have to allocate funds for a web developer because it is a highly specialized skill that cannot be done by somebody with little to no experience. Businesses face a direct opportunity cost when deciding how much time and money they want to invest in their website development.

Some businesses skip hiring a web developer altogether, thus cutting costs and trying to get by with an Instagram page that is promoting the goods and services they provide. This however, can be problematic, especially when Instagram accounts need to be backed up to company websites and portals for payment. 

These are just some of the reasons why web development is in such high demand. Building out features on a new website requires a web developer, and in order for companies to compete at the firm level, they need to have a functional website that does not detract from their overall image. In 2018 alone, web development was in the 8th spot for Best Technology Jobs as part of the U.S. News & World Report that year. In the same year, US News reported that the median salary for web developers was $69,430. The best-paid 25 percent made $95,020 that year, while the lowest-paid 25 percent made $50,990.

So, clearly, the first major benefit of being a web developer is the security it provides in terms of salary and ability to live in major U.S. cities affordably. Web developers know clients will pay their price if they have no other options.

But lets get to some of the more precise details of what being a web developer looks like so we can better understand other benefits individuals in this profession seek out: 

Daily working schedules

Bethanne Zink is a web developer based in New York City who has reported via SkillCrush what her daily working responsibilities entail. She is an alumni of the 3 month web development program at the Flatiron School. She describes her working day as really starting around 10am and spending a little more than half of her day building out features on clients websites, but also approximately 40 percent of her time delegating tasks to other team members and troubleshooting with team members who “get stuck” with coding problems.

While Bethanne is a team lead and has an exciting career, she often works on the weekends and finds herself helping clients almost every day of the week because there is always work to do. This means that web development jobs can be full of creative pursuits when it comes to building out features, but if project managers get fatigued with helping everyone else and become extra-milers, there needs to be some added benefit for doing this kind of work.

This is where company culture comes in. Recalling a trip to the San Jose area last year, it was common to go to the Whole Foods outdoor patio around dinner time and find groups of co-workers sitting with their laptops and a meal, some with drinks chatting away and others intent on working into the nighttime. To some, this lifestyle is appealing and one of the major added benefits of working in this sector is being around like-minded individuals who feel good to be around whether its at lunchtime or 7 o’clock at night.

This also ties into the 3rd benefit of working as a web developer which are the perks that come with long working hours, such as generous paid time off (PTO) and also other add-ons like discounted gym memberships, transportation discounts and credits, and other services that make life easier, especially for urbanites. While not everyone will be able to work as a web developer for the New York Times or Airbnb, the sector in general compensates its web development employees with perks to safeguard against burnout.

Benefits
Web Developers
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

Related Articles