Recruiters
July 22, 2020

What Do Developer Recruiters Do?

Sometimes more broadly termed “tech” recruiters, this is the job for a niche sector of technology in which a professional looks for the best candidates in web development, mobile application development, and other coding and technology development roles.
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Being a tech recruiter is different from other types of recruiting because of the specificity of the industry and the special demand that each role places on candidates. Unlike a more general field like business development for example, where key financial information and KPIs for an individuals performance in terms of sales, ROI, and leadership abilities are good working material for recruiters—tech recruiters take a more nuanced approach to finding the right fit.

For example, web developers or mobile application developers have a select skillset in coding and other languages that might be demanded for certain organizations looking to fill roles. Tech recruiters will need to find out in first or second round interviews the level of comfortableness candidates have with coding language regardless of what is on their resume or what they claim. It is the job of recruiters to not only peruse over many resumes to find coding compatibilities between organization and candidate, but also to find secondary interests through a candidate's blog or Twitter account.

Blogging as a selling point

It might seem like only candidates who major in creative writing or the arts to run successful blogs to showcase their interests, but actually candidates who contribute to tech blogs and have a strong Twitter following can also promote their interests in a similar fashion. From a recruiter’s perspective, being in the middle of a second or third round interview, and having a blog to talk about in conversation and some main thematic points and interests, such as AI or Machine Learning, can go a long way. Showing off a blog or passion in this regard lets the recruiter know the candidate is not just skilled in coding, but serious about their past and present contributions to technology and the industry in general.

Educational Background

For many recruiters who work in other sectors like Communications, Media, and Business Administration, having a strong degree from a good school can go a long way. This is the traditional way recruiters have always found candidates and admired at their degree programs. Candidates who attend Ivy League Schools especially have high job placement rates in Business and Finance. The prestige of some academic programs usually translates into competence when a recruiter sees such a resume, and leads to rounds of interviewing fairly quickly if everything else checks out.

But the coding and development world works a little bit differently. According to a StackOverflow survey, 56% of software engineers do not hold a CS degree. Other technical degrees, like Electrical Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics will also receive preference in the recruiting process.

Another option and relevancy is coding boot camp. According to Course Report, 73% of bootcamp graduates found job placements within three months of course completion and experienced an average salary increase of 64 percent. Development recruiters are always keen on candidates who have been to a coding bootcamp as it does ensure some measure of how well coders perform under pressure and on deadlines and special projects. Working well under pressure is an essential skill recruiters look for across industries, not just tech.  

Industry Trends

Along with recruiting for a strong resume, LinkedIn profile and potential blog, it is also the job of tech or developer recruiters to continuously follow up on trends of the industry, read up on tech blogs, see what the developments are in Silicon Valley, and so on. The tech world moves pretty fast, it is innovative by design, and developments in AI and Machine Learning are just two examples of sub-sectors that are always changing, with lots of press and editorials on such issues.

Reading up on the trajectory of the tech and developer industry will also ensure a smoother first and second round interview with candidates who are also up to date on their tech news, and use such information as talking points with recruiters to seem knowledgeable about different issues. These conversations for recruiters are like lightbulbs that will go, making the job of referring a candidate to a hiring manager that much easier. While tech and developer candidates don’t have to be the most extroverted members of society, they do need to speak with accuracy about how their work relates to the sector more broadly.

TagsDeveloper RecruitersTech Recruiters
Michael Robbins
Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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RecruitersJuly 22, 2020
What Do Developer Recruiters Do?
Sometimes more broadly termed “tech” recruiters, this is the job for a niche sector of technology in which a professional looks for the best candidates in web development, mobile application development, and other coding and technology development roles.

Being a tech recruiter is different from other types of recruiting because of the specificity of the industry and the special demand that each role places on candidates. Unlike a more general field like business development for example, where key financial information and KPIs for an individuals performance in terms of sales, ROI, and leadership abilities are good working material for recruiters—tech recruiters take a more nuanced approach to finding the right fit.

For example, web developers or mobile application developers have a select skillset in coding and other languages that might be demanded for certain organizations looking to fill roles. Tech recruiters will need to find out in first or second round interviews the level of comfortableness candidates have with coding language regardless of what is on their resume or what they claim. It is the job of recruiters to not only peruse over many resumes to find coding compatibilities between organization and candidate, but also to find secondary interests through a candidate's blog or Twitter account.

Blogging as a selling point

It might seem like only candidates who major in creative writing or the arts to run successful blogs to showcase their interests, but actually candidates who contribute to tech blogs and have a strong Twitter following can also promote their interests in a similar fashion. From a recruiter’s perspective, being in the middle of a second or third round interview, and having a blog to talk about in conversation and some main thematic points and interests, such as AI or Machine Learning, can go a long way. Showing off a blog or passion in this regard lets the recruiter know the candidate is not just skilled in coding, but serious about their past and present contributions to technology and the industry in general.

Educational Background

For many recruiters who work in other sectors like Communications, Media, and Business Administration, having a strong degree from a good school can go a long way. This is the traditional way recruiters have always found candidates and admired at their degree programs. Candidates who attend Ivy League Schools especially have high job placement rates in Business and Finance. The prestige of some academic programs usually translates into competence when a recruiter sees such a resume, and leads to rounds of interviewing fairly quickly if everything else checks out.

But the coding and development world works a little bit differently. According to a StackOverflow survey, 56% of software engineers do not hold a CS degree. Other technical degrees, like Electrical Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics will also receive preference in the recruiting process.

Another option and relevancy is coding boot camp. According to Course Report, 73% of bootcamp graduates found job placements within three months of course completion and experienced an average salary increase of 64 percent. Development recruiters are always keen on candidates who have been to a coding bootcamp as it does ensure some measure of how well coders perform under pressure and on deadlines and special projects. Working well under pressure is an essential skill recruiters look for across industries, not just tech.  

Industry Trends

Along with recruiting for a strong resume, LinkedIn profile and potential blog, it is also the job of tech or developer recruiters to continuously follow up on trends of the industry, read up on tech blogs, see what the developments are in Silicon Valley, and so on. The tech world moves pretty fast, it is innovative by design, and developments in AI and Machine Learning are just two examples of sub-sectors that are always changing, with lots of press and editorials on such issues.

Reading up on the trajectory of the tech and developer industry will also ensure a smoother first and second round interview with candidates who are also up to date on their tech news, and use such information as talking points with recruiters to seem knowledgeable about different issues. These conversations for recruiters are like lightbulbs that will go, making the job of referring a candidate to a hiring manager that much easier. While tech and developer candidates don’t have to be the most extroverted members of society, they do need to speak with accuracy about how their work relates to the sector more broadly.

Developer Recruiters
Tech Recruiters
About the author
Michael Robbins -Writer
Michael is a writer that helps organizations align their mission and values to a wide audience.

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