Developers
August 7, 2020

Apache Foundation Releases Apache Wicket v9: the Lastest Open Source Java Web Application Framework

The Apache Foundation has just released a significant update to Wicket, the open source Java web application framework.

The Apache Software Foundation has released version 9 of Apache Wicket, the open source, Java-based web application framework. This release is a major upgrade, far more than even a 1.0 status often carries.

What Is Apache Wicket?

One of Apache’s top-level projects, Wicket is one of the premier frameworks for developing web applications in Java. But why use Java for web development?

While many may think of Java primarily in the context of creating software for Android, Java is widely used for web application development. In particular, the language is especially suited for backend server programming. This is, in large part, due to the speed Java offers. The financial sector relies heavily on Java for server-side programming and applications, with Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Barclays and others relying on it. Similarly, some of the biggest names in tech rely on Java for their backend development, including Twitter, Netflix and Priceline.

As a result, having a Java framework for web application development is an important part of the Java/web ecosystem.

“Invented in 2004, Wicket is one of the few survivors of the Java serverside web framework wars of the mid 2000’s,” says the Wicket home page. “Wicket is an open source, component oriented, serverside, Java web application framework. With a history of over a decade, it is still going strong and has a solid future ahead. Learn why you should consider Wicket for your next web application.”

Wicket has a number of advantages for Java developers involved in web app development. First and foremost is Wicket’s emphasis on Java and HTML, keeping things simple and standards-compliant. Wicket’s AJAX support is superb, making it easy to create AJAX components without having to write any JavaScript code. The framework is also very secure, ensuring URLs don’t expose private information.

The Move to Version 9

Unfortunately, many Java web developers have been stuck using Java 8 and older versions of Wicket. Version 9 endeavors to change that, embracing Java 11 and working to make it easier to migrate web applications to the newer version.

"Java has deeply changed in the last few years," said Andrea Del Bene, Vice President of Apache Wicket and Apache Wicket v9.0 Release Manager. "In addition to the new release policy, starting with version 9 Java platform went through a massive refactoring aimed to modularize its code base and remove legacy classes and packages. With Wicket 9 we fully embraced this new Java course migrating our codebase to Java 11 LTS, offering a fundamental tool to keep your code up to date with Java evolution."

As part of this process, Apache has worked to minimize the amount of work necessary to keep pace with Java updates.

“The release of Java 9 has been a turning point in Java history which laid the foundation for the modern Java era,” says the project’s home page. “However, the magnitude of this change has discouraged many developers from leaving the safe harbor represented by Java 8. With Wicket 9 we finally have a fundamental tool to move on and bring our web applications into the new Java world.

“With this version Wicket has been completely revisited and improved to embrace new technologies such as Java modularization and new libraries like JUnit 5.

“With Java releasing at a faster pace it's important to keep a library up to date with the latest changes introduced in the platform and ensure it works with the latest Java release. Wicket does all of this by taking part in the OpenJDK Quality Outreach, an initiative aimed to test popular Open Source projects with both the latest OpenJDK release and the Early Access release.”

The advantages of the new framework were extolled by many of its existing users, some of whom praised Wicket in general, while others praised version 9 specifically.

"Apache Wicket is the most suitable framework for OneDev," said Robin Shen, owner of the OneDev project, "With Wicket I can work with the same set of code from front-end to back-end, with Java's mature libraries and toolings. I must say I gained great productivity with Wicket."

"At ParnasSys we work with very private data of millions of students in our student information system," said Robert Kromkamp, manager of software development at ParnasSys. "Since we are very keen about the security and privacy of our customers, we immediately adopted the new content security policy (CSP) feature of Wicket 9, so we can deploy an improved, more secure ParnasSys when the final release hits. Wicket has proven to be resilient and secure through the years, and we are very happy that Wicket continues to adopt new security standards in a developer friendly way."

"At ValueCare we use Apache Wicket to build our main interactive web-application, which offers our users insight into their business-data easily," said Rob Audenaerde, Technical Lead at ValueCare. "Apache Wicket is a well structured, object-oriented Java framework that allows for quick extension and customization. This reduces our time to market for new features, because we can rapidly prototype and develop new components as needed."

A Java Framework For Modern Web Development

Without a doubt, this latest release of Wicket brings Java-based web development into the modern age. It brings the framework up to parity with the most recent Java release and gives developers a solid platform for future development.

As more and more companies turn to Java for web development, Wicket has a bright future head of it, as do developers who choose to specialize in it.

TagsApache Wicket v9Jave FrameworkWeb Development
Matt Milano
Technical Writer
Matt is a tech journalist and writer with a background in web and software development.

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DevelopersAugust 7, 2020
Apache Foundation Releases Apache Wicket v9: the Lastest Open Source Java Web Application Framework
The Apache Foundation has just released a significant update to Wicket, the open source Java web application framework.

The Apache Software Foundation has released version 9 of Apache Wicket, the open source, Java-based web application framework. This release is a major upgrade, far more than even a 1.0 status often carries.

What Is Apache Wicket?

One of Apache’s top-level projects, Wicket is one of the premier frameworks for developing web applications in Java. But why use Java for web development?

While many may think of Java primarily in the context of creating software for Android, Java is widely used for web application development. In particular, the language is especially suited for backend server programming. This is, in large part, due to the speed Java offers. The financial sector relies heavily on Java for server-side programming and applications, with Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Barclays and others relying on it. Similarly, some of the biggest names in tech rely on Java for their backend development, including Twitter, Netflix and Priceline.

As a result, having a Java framework for web application development is an important part of the Java/web ecosystem.

“Invented in 2004, Wicket is one of the few survivors of the Java serverside web framework wars of the mid 2000’s,” says the Wicket home page. “Wicket is an open source, component oriented, serverside, Java web application framework. With a history of over a decade, it is still going strong and has a solid future ahead. Learn why you should consider Wicket for your next web application.”

Wicket has a number of advantages for Java developers involved in web app development. First and foremost is Wicket’s emphasis on Java and HTML, keeping things simple and standards-compliant. Wicket’s AJAX support is superb, making it easy to create AJAX components without having to write any JavaScript code. The framework is also very secure, ensuring URLs don’t expose private information.

The Move to Version 9

Unfortunately, many Java web developers have been stuck using Java 8 and older versions of Wicket. Version 9 endeavors to change that, embracing Java 11 and working to make it easier to migrate web applications to the newer version.

"Java has deeply changed in the last few years," said Andrea Del Bene, Vice President of Apache Wicket and Apache Wicket v9.0 Release Manager. "In addition to the new release policy, starting with version 9 Java platform went through a massive refactoring aimed to modularize its code base and remove legacy classes and packages. With Wicket 9 we fully embraced this new Java course migrating our codebase to Java 11 LTS, offering a fundamental tool to keep your code up to date with Java evolution."

As part of this process, Apache has worked to minimize the amount of work necessary to keep pace with Java updates.

“The release of Java 9 has been a turning point in Java history which laid the foundation for the modern Java era,” says the project’s home page. “However, the magnitude of this change has discouraged many developers from leaving the safe harbor represented by Java 8. With Wicket 9 we finally have a fundamental tool to move on and bring our web applications into the new Java world.

“With this version Wicket has been completely revisited and improved to embrace new technologies such as Java modularization and new libraries like JUnit 5.

“With Java releasing at a faster pace it's important to keep a library up to date with the latest changes introduced in the platform and ensure it works with the latest Java release. Wicket does all of this by taking part in the OpenJDK Quality Outreach, an initiative aimed to test popular Open Source projects with both the latest OpenJDK release and the Early Access release.”

The advantages of the new framework were extolled by many of its existing users, some of whom praised Wicket in general, while others praised version 9 specifically.

"Apache Wicket is the most suitable framework for OneDev," said Robin Shen, owner of the OneDev project, "With Wicket I can work with the same set of code from front-end to back-end, with Java's mature libraries and toolings. I must say I gained great productivity with Wicket."

"At ParnasSys we work with very private data of millions of students in our student information system," said Robert Kromkamp, manager of software development at ParnasSys. "Since we are very keen about the security and privacy of our customers, we immediately adopted the new content security policy (CSP) feature of Wicket 9, so we can deploy an improved, more secure ParnasSys when the final release hits. Wicket has proven to be resilient and secure through the years, and we are very happy that Wicket continues to adopt new security standards in a developer friendly way."

"At ValueCare we use Apache Wicket to build our main interactive web-application, which offers our users insight into their business-data easily," said Rob Audenaerde, Technical Lead at ValueCare. "Apache Wicket is a well structured, object-oriented Java framework that allows for quick extension and customization. This reduces our time to market for new features, because we can rapidly prototype and develop new components as needed."

A Java Framework For Modern Web Development

Without a doubt, this latest release of Wicket brings Java-based web development into the modern age. It brings the framework up to parity with the most recent Java release and gives developers a solid platform for future development.

As more and more companies turn to Java for web development, Wicket has a bright future head of it, as do developers who choose to specialize in it.

Apache Wicket v9
Jave Framework
Web Development
About the author
Matt Milano -Technical Writer
Matt is a tech journalist and writer with a background in web and software development.

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